Cortex Generation 1

$40.00
Cortex Generation 1
2.5

Value for Money

1/10

Formula Rating

4/10

Pros

  • Contains Uridine Monophosphate
  • Contains CDP-Choline
  • No fillers in proprietary blend

Cons

  • PROPRIETARY BLEND!
  • No vitamin or mineral support
  • Manufacturer displays neurotic behaviour

 


Warning: The manufacturer responded to this post in a very threatening, rather stupid manner (see comments below, some of which are made under different names but from the same IP address). Our social media person then gave him a chance to explain why anyone should buy a stack that has a mystery formula. He failed to answer the question, simply stating that we were “myopic” in not taking the strains of being a manufacturer into account (as if his failings mean squat to a consumer).


Cortex Generation 1 Review Summary

We didn’t try Cortex Generation 1: Workhorse ourselves, because after reviewing the supplement based on its formula (which is shrouded in mystery), the manufacturer responded like a psychopath. 

The manufacturer thinks he has solid reasons for withholding the serving sizes, but that does not mean that customers should therefore buy this product, particularly when plenty of other manufacturers do divulge their formula. The manufacturer, Ryan Ballow, thinks it is myopic (clearly his word of the day) to not factor in the manufacturer’s struggles when evaluating a product. We think he needs to learn the concept of market competition. 

Even if divulging a formula exactly made it impossible to make money, that isn’t your problem as a customer. That’s the manufacturer’s problem. Our advice will always be to buy stacks that provide at least a rough breakdown of serving sizes. Don’t worry about the manufacturer; his problems are his, you should focus on getting the best value for your dollars. Cortex Generation 1 is not it. 

Where To Buy Cortex Generation 1

We aren’t sure if this is still on sale directly from Ryan, but you can pick it up from Amazon. 

 

 


Full Cortex Generation 1 Review

Launched in February 2016, Cortex Generation 1: Workhorse is supposedly a “revolutionary nootropic”.

It was formulated by a serial entrepreneur and YouTube personality by the name of Ryan Michael Ballow (formerly Ryan Critchett). 

Ryan goes to great lengths to associate the product with himself; he stars in the marketing material, he himself runs the Twitter account, and he alone seems to have been behind the product’s formulation. He did have an entire YouTube channel dedicated to his nootropic supplement trials (in which he strongly recommends Modafinil use), but these gave way to other projects (more on these later). 

In any case, there is still plenty of information on Cortex Generation 1: Workhorse out there. From this point on though, we will drop the “Workhorse” part of the name; poor branding if we’ve ever seen it. 

Ryan gives us a pretty precise list of the things we can expect from taking Cortex Generation 1 on a regular basis. These benefits include:  

 

  • Enhancement in verbal fluency
  • Powerful brain energy
  • Mental integration
  • Focus endurance
  • Memory boost 

 

The Cortex Generation 1 website actually goes much further than just listing abstract and immeasurable benefits. We are told precisely what we can expect and why we can expect it.

 

Cortex Generation 1 Review

 

For instance, visitors to the website are told that “Cortex Gen 1 nootropic also delivers a powerful short term and working memory effect that appears consistent in all of the early adopters/test subjects we’ve used to sample the product”.

If that’s true, then Mr Ballow has produced supplement gold.

So is it true? Can Cortex Generation 1 actually do this? Does it improve verbal acuity? Does it improve both short and long-term memory function? Is it safe? We will answer all of these questions and more in our full Cortex Generation 1 review. We will also highlight some of the comments made by the product’s manufacturer, iPad guru and Chief Political Analyst at The Red Doctrine, Mr Ryan Michael Ballow. 

 

-The 3 Best Nootropic Stacks 2017-

 


Cortex Generation 1 Formula

Cortex Generation 1 contains relatively few ingredients: just four in fact.

The ingredients that it does contain, however, do show a lot of promise in terms of delivering nootropic benefits.

 

Here is the ingredients list as shown on the label:

 

Cortex Generation 1 Formula

 

As you can see, we aren’t given individual ingredient serving sizes. All we have is a big, homogeneous proprietary blend with a total size of 610mg. 

Now, we loathe proprietary blends on this site. They always, without question, represent relatively poor value for money. 

We simply don’t understand why manufacturers use them, beyond of course to disguise how cheap and low-quality their product is in reality. 

So many supplements reveal their full formula specs and they still sell many thousands of units per year.

However, not all proprietary blends are as bad as one another. They are all worse than totally transparent supplements, but some are better, some are worse.

Cortex Generation 1, to its credit, does not contain any ‘filler’ ingredients. All of the substances used in this formula have their own scientifically-verified nootropic properties. Each of them brings something of their own to the table. There is no ingredient that could really be said to be a cheap, ineffective blend-stuffer. 

Here’s a quick overview of all the ingredients and what they do:

 

Uridine Monophosphate: Uridine monophosphate is a nucleotide that binds to other molecules to form RNA; the nucleic acid responsible for gene coding and expression.

While the method of action remains unclear, several studies have shown that uridine monophosphate supplementation can lead to significant improvements in memory function and learning ability.

In one study, published in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, found that adult gerbils fed a number of compounds experienced clear improvements in their ability to learn, remember, and focus.

 

Cortex Generation 1 ingredients

 

Bacopa monnieri: A herbal extract used for hundreds, if not thousands, of years to enhance memory, alleviate stress, and slow mental decline. It has some pretty impressive anti-oxidant properties, and it is being studied closely for its ability to improve memory retention and recall.

Some manufacturers are suggesting that it has the ability to improve synaptic communication, but we have our doubts as to whether this is its primary mechanism of action. Bacopa seems to work better the longer it is taken for, which is exactly what we want from a daily nootropic stack. 

 

 

CDP-choline: Also known as Citicoline, CDP-choline is one of the many substances that you can take if you want to raise your acetylcholine levels. Choline is a biological precursor to acetylcholine, which is a key neurotransmitter for a number of brain functions. 

In fact, CDP-Choline is one of the best cholinergenics there is. It not only quickly and efficiently raises acetylcholine levels, but it also has other, secondary nootropic benefits. You can learn more about it here.

Supplementing with choline is not an efficient way to increase the availability of acetylcholine, as it is not properly able to cross the blood-brain barrier. CDP-choline offers a more reliable way of giving your brain more acetylcholine to work with (although in my opinion, more efficient substances exist). A superb ingredient for any stack, if the dosage is right.

 

Artichoke extract: Cortex Generation 1 is not the only nootropic to contain artichoke extract, but it is one of the few. Many people dismiss this ingredient as ineffective, while others think it is a panacea, but a lack of study means that both extremes are wrong. I’ve written about the promise this stuff holds on my nootropics ingredient page.

Early research suggests that artichoke extract may have the ability to suppress the enzyme PDE4. PDE4 is responsible for the breakdown of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. In theory, this should lead directly to improvements in focus and concentration ‘stamina’.

 

-Does Green Tea Deserve The Hype?-

 

 


Our Thoughts On Cortex Generation 1 

Unfortunately, we can’t say that we think it’s a good idea for anyone to buy Cortex Generation 1. 

 

We don’t think it’s a good idea for one very simple reason:

Since the leading nootropic stacks all provide detailed dosage information, there is no need to buy products that keep their formula a secret, regardless of their reasons for doing so. 

 

We cannot abide supplement companies that do not list their formula, milligram by milligram. Leading manufacturers of all kinds of supplements manage to make a killing while divulging their product specifications, so I think every product should be held to that standard, no matter how compelling their reasons are for not revealing their doses. 

Cortex Generation 1, to its great credit, does not really contain any fillers. Unlike other supplements, the proprietary blend will therefore not simply be 99% caffeine or B6. 

It is still, however, a proprietary blend, and this site will always advise people to buy products with clearly delineated formulas. Here’s why. 

 

The Fundamental Problem With Mystery Blends

You should always review a supplement’s exact contents before buying. You should decide exactly what you put into your body and in what quantity, rather than making decisions based solely on marketing or anecdotal evidence provided by the manufacturer. 

Take nutritional supplements like protein shakes, for example. 

Imagine a friend comes to you with a tub of protein powder which simply says on the label that it contains “enough protein”.

The manufacturer claims to know that this amount of protein is “ideal” (despite everyone being a little different). He spent years finding what works best for him, and that’s how much is in there.

Would you tell this friend to buy it when a plethora of products exist which tell you exactly what you’re getting for your money? Of course not. 

Exactly the same logic applies to Cortex Generation 1, and to nootropics more generally. 

Without dose information, many people will buy into the marketing, buy a bottle, and find that it does very little for them – people who would have otherwise not have bought the product had they known that the serving sizes were too small for their personal needs. 

Other people will find that the stack causes side effects – side effects that they would have seen coming had they known that the stack contained a serving of X ingredient that they know to be too much for them. 

This is, in our opinion, an incredibly pessimistic way to run a business.

By not allowing people the chance to judge for themselves whether they want a product before they buy it, you’re basically banking on them taking a gamble. 

That gamble is just completely unnecessary. Plenty of effective nootropic stacks provide detailed dosage information before you buy the product. These manufacturers have confidence in their formula, so you can too. 

 

Cortex Generation 1 and synaptogenesis

 

Learning From Experience

You may be thinking; sure, but isn’t it possible for people to buy a supplement with a totally divulged formula and still be disappointed? Well, yes, of course it is, but it’s still vital to know what is in a supplement if we are to learn from the experience. 

Ryan Ballow, the maker of Cortex Generation 1, places a high value on personal experience when judging nootropic stacks. I do too, which is exactly why it’s important to know exactly how much of certain substances you’re taking. 

If you try Cortex Generation 1, and it does nothing, you will have no idea why it did nothing. You have no formula to look at and learn from, no dose sizes to learn from: all you will have learned is that a certain amount of CDP-Choline mixed with a certain amount of UMP, Bacopa and Artichoke Extract did nothing for you. 

If you had doses, you could say, “well, maybe I’ll try more CDP-Choline next time.” This is part of the process of finding the nootropic stack that works best for you, and Cortex denies you that opportunity. 

 

Why would a manufacturer keep the formula secret? – Ryan Ballow’s Flimsy Defence

Ryan Michael Ballow claims to have very good reasons for keeping his formula a secret: 

 

Cortex Generation 1 comment review

 

That is a good explanation of why manufacturers might want to keep their formulas a secret. It is also a classic case of question-dodging displayed by the brand ambassador for a nootropic claiming to deliver “mental integration”.

When posed with the claim that customers should be very weary of buying products that hide their formula, the maker responds with a reason why the manufacturer might want to hide the formula.

This has no bearing on whether or not a customer should be weary of those products. His response is loosely related to the claim posed to him, but it does nothing to counter it. It is irrelevant. 

The manufacturer also claims that he spent a long time, and a lot of money, making the perfect stack, so we don’t need to know serving sizes.

Obviously, the amount of money spent making a formula does not mean that it is therefore going to be effective. People waste money all the time. 

Simple.

The appeal to the time and money spent making something as proof of its value is called affirming the consequent, for all those who are interested: “If it’s good, they probably spent a lot of money on it. I spent a lot of money on it, therefore it’s probably good” makes no logical sense. 

 

Cortex Generation 1 Overview

 

There are plenty of examples of logical fallacies committed by Cortex Generation 1’s manufacturer, such as the claim that his status as a “legit guy” means that Cortex Generation 1 must be a good supplement (genetic fallacy), or his repeated use of ad hominem arguments to discredit the opinion presented on this blog (as though personal inclination could be shown to be false).

Examples of these fallacies can be found in the comment section below. 

At several points, he simply descends to hurling insults at the author of this post. 

He also tweeted us saying that we could keep the blog up, then demanded its removal shortly after. We were also treated to a picture of him in his car! 

Clearly, Cortex Generation 1 is not providing him with the intellectual clout it should be. 

You can also see the manufacturer threatening this site’s reviewers both in the comments below and on our Twitter page

 

Displaying your stupidity so brazenly online is a bad move for a nootropics manufacturer. As a brand ambassador, I really don’t think he’s doing Cortex Generation 1 any favours. 

 


Unusual Behaviour of Manufacturer

Since we were told that we were “barking up the wrong tree” by Mr. Ballow (confusing the phrase for a threat), we have actually heard very little.

That was until we discovered what Ryan has been doing with his time. It seems he has been spending a large portion of his time doing one of two things:

  1. Taking Modafinil
  2. Writing articles for a pseudo-political “news” site he has created
  3. Musing about how amazing he is at business and how stupid younger people are

You can find the latter by searching for his YouTube channel.

Unfortunately, Ryan has removed all of the videos he created for The Red Doctrine; a political magazine which he wrote, published, broadcast, and to which he appointed himself as Chief Political Adviser. 

We can’t imagine how many hours Ryan poured into The Red Doctrine, or how many throats he had to step on to earn his title of Chief Political Analyst, but it seems like a great waste to us. 

In any case, there’s still plenty of gold to be found on his channel today.

Here’s a brilliant video, which shows just how mentally super-charged the most entrepreneurial of entrepreneurs has become:

 

We think he has clearly just left a conference and been irritated at how well some other people are doing.

Notice how he loathes how they spew out lingo, before going on to wonder aloud: “Did he ever look at a real life P&L statement and try to optimize expenses…you know and revenue…to modulate…to positively modulate the P&L statement.”

You showed them Ryan!

 

-Does The Type Of Coffee You Drink Really Matter?-

 


Cortex Generation 1 Side Effects

It’s impossible to speak with any real accuracy about the possible side effects of Cortex since we don’t have an accurate formula to go on. All judgments of this nature are relative, and since lots of other stacks do give dose information, Cortex Generation 1 poses a relatively high risk of eliciting side effects.

I asked the manufacturer whether he could give me any dosage information, but all I was given was minimum contents sizes. All I know is that there are “at least 50mg” of CDP-Choline in Cortex Generation 1, which doesn’t help us much here. 

Judging by the statements of the manufacturer on forums such as Reddit, I don’t think it’s likely that this product will cause any side effects in most users. He repeatedly stresses the benefit of taking very low doses of cholinergics (so CDP-Choline here).

Again though, products with specified dosages are always more reliable when it comes to predicting side effects. 

 


Cortex Generation 1 Review Conclusion

Cortex Generation 1 contains some great ingredients, but they’re only really effective above a certain threshold, and the likes of CDP-Choline are only side-effect free when taken below a certain threshold. Sadly, we don’t know whether the ingredients in Cortex generation 1 fall within this band or not. 

Cortex Generation 1 is undoubtedly going to be effective for some people. But that doesn’t mean that it represents a sound choice for people looking for a reliable stack, because there is absolutely no way to tell if you are likely to benefit from it. 

There’s also no way to learn from this stack; you can’t make a decision on what works for you if you have no idea how much of any given substance you’re taking. 

If you want to take the risk, then by all means do so. But we would always advise people to buy a stack that contains known quantities of reliable, effective nootropic substances. 

The manufacturer is clearly not responding well to this product; that and his heavy Modafinil consumption is causing some very strange behavior.

If you want real results then invest in a professional quality nootropic.

Cortex Generation 1: Should I Buy It?
Opt In Image
Looking For A Serious Nootropic?
Check Out Our Current Top Rated Stack!

We have reviewed hundreds of nootropics and this supplement is still the most impressive. Our review team used this product for months and all experienced:

  • Heightened focus
  • Enhanced memory function
  • More mental energy
  • Better mental performance under stress

Read our full review to find out if this is the nootropic you have been looking for.

 

25 thoughts on “Cortex Generation 1: Should I Buy It?

  • 2016 at 6:53 pm
    Permalink

    In “your opinion?” Who’s opinon? Correct me if I’m wrong, but the only identification of who you are on this post is the title “Author” at the top of it.

    You state that it’s “doubtful that it lives up to its claims,” meanwhile you put zero effort into communicating with me, or anyone at Surrogate Labs (the company that makes Cortex), but the beta program we launched months ago to have more than 2 dozen people sample the product, including NCOs in the United States military, and well known entrepreneurs (which is who the product is intended to help).

    Supplement formulas, (this is something you know, but obviously aren’t willing to highlight) are proprietary for very good reasons. Unlike many of the other businesses out there that believe the world is too friendly for a direct copy cat of their formula/business idea to emerge, we (Surrogate Labs) understand and have experience with quite the opposite. I (Ryan Michael Ballow), own several companies, and have competed with major players in the iOS device services industry, many of whom have stolen direct strategies from one my companies in that industry. And it has effected our business.

    So – your case that Cortex’s claims of efficacy are somehow radical or “outlandish” as you put it, is purely just a talking point, without much reality based substance to it.

    You make the statement that we have “something to hide,” based on the fact that we’re not putting the ingredient quantity on the label. Again, something a TON of supplement manufacturers do. What’s to hide? Are you kidding? We have a formula that I bled, sweated, and cried making for over a year, with a lab I set up in my living room, and the level of detail for notating the effects, and executing the beta testing program that OBVIOUSLY you don’t appreciate, and frankly, by the CRASS nature of your post here, couldn’t execute yourself.

    No. I apologize if it doesn’t meet your moral, armchair, sideline standards for me to DIVULGE my formula that I worked tirelessly to create, with every intention to deliver a nootropic that actually works (rather than stuffing 8 of the most common nootropic compounds out there into a package, and calling it awesome, like most other companies do), and is completely minimal.

    So – your question is answered: “If you’re going to list all of your ingredients, and I can only assume that Cortex has listed all of its ingredients, why not show their respective concentrations?”

    Now I assume that you’ll likely just have an opinion about our formula protection strategy? Great. You don’t own the company, are not in business for yourself, and don’t have to worry about competitors stealing your formula. I do.

    Did you try Cortex?

    Because I know all of the people, by name, contact information, and address that were on the beta testing list. And you’re not one of them. So how can you make such statements like: “I don’t think it will deliver.”

    Part of your premise, that the product isn’t trustable, because “we also don’t yet have any reliable anecdotal evidence to go on. Therefore, the most accurate assessment of the side effects risk is who knows,” is also fatally flawed, and predictably turns the question to the nature of the accuracy of your review: because you haven’t tried the product, the basic assessment one should make while reading this review (a review of a product that hasn’t come out yet, that the author hasn’t tried) is, well, I guess, “who knows?”

    No government bodies sanction any supplements. The ingredients fall into the dietary supplement category, and we lawfully (both on the bottle, and on the website) list the dietary supplement FDA clause. Point refuted there. And moving on.

    You basically tried to make CDP Choline look a lot less impressive than it really is, which seems to be in line with the rest of your review here in your very obvious, overt and intentional strategy to discount the efficacy of the stack.

    You mentioned that it increases the amount of acetylcholine in the brain, but failed to mention that it also:
    1. Stimulates the release of catecholamines.
    2. Is a major cofactor in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine, via the kennedy cycle.
    3. Cytidine (part of CDP Choline – the nomenclature is: Cytidine Diphosphocholine) converts to uridine, a substance you went out of your way to AGREE is a beneficial nootropic substance.
    4. Has been noted to act as a membranes stabilizer after strokes. Not a nootropic benefit, but wait.. yes it is.
    5. From Examine.com: in otherwise healthy and youthful rodents, CDP-Choline appears to have some potential as a Nootropic compound and memory enhancer but is not 100% reliable. (NOTHING IS)

    It then goes on to say, and get this:
    When it does enhance memory formation, it does so at a potency comparable to Piracetam.

    Your theory (which is exactly what it is) that the stack in total (Cortex Gen 1) couldn’t possibly confer short term benefits, based on the notion that the stack was designed to facilitate long term benefits, is also incorrect.

    There is no “Garbage” elsewhere in the formula. There is a flow agent called Leucine, (which is a branched chain amino acid that helps muscle protein synthesis) which comes in a negligible amount, which is required by most supplement manufacturers. That’s it. There is nothing else.

    Where else to refute? Ah.

    You gave it a 1 out of 10 for price because you think that all of our work, and thousands of dollars paid to create the formula, should just be tossed by the side so that we can sell our product for cheap, to compete with other nootropic stacks out there?

    Because anyone can just buy the ingredients and concoct their own version of it for cheaper? Is that why?

    If so – neither of those make any sense. The first, from a business perspective (this is me again eluding to the fact that you likely have never started and ran a successful real business before for any appreciable amount of time), and the second because: in order to do that, one would have to do exactly what we did to find the perfect quantity of those ingredients, including:

    1. Start with a hypothesis on what quantity of each ingredient would be optimal based on available science.
    2. Take said formula and complete a full questionnaire on how it effects you, as well as jot down additional relevant notes.
    3. Analyze said questionnaire and relevant notes for hours, and maybe days.
    4. Slightly change one of the ingredients’ milligram quantity. This has to happen one ingredient at a time, so that accurate results and analysis can take place, which takes a very long time.
    5. Take the supplement.
    6. Rinse and repeat for months.

    Yep. Pretty easy I guess.

    Again – since you decline to even present yourself as an actual human being with a name, a history, some social profiles, and a list of accomplishments, I’m going to conclude what we all have the suspicion of: you’re armchairing a review about a product you’ve never tried, because you have an obvious aversion to claims of efficacy of a certain class of dietary supplements, likely due to your history, you like to be condescending and sarcastic, and you don’t appreciate the level of granularity it takes to build a business from scratch, and genuinely work to put out an extremely good product.

    But that’s nothing new. There are billions of you. Far less of people like me.

    Ryan Michael Ballow
    Founder, Surrogate Labs LLC
    Creator of Cortex Nootropic

    Reply
    • 2016 at 12:56 pm
      Permalink

      “Did you try Cortex?

      Because I know all of the people, by name, contact information, and address that were on the beta testing list. And you’re not one of them. So how can you make such statements like: “I don’t think it will deliver.””

      No I didn’t try Cortex. I never once claim that I have tried it myself. The words “I don’t think it will deliver” are perfectly consistent with not having tried the product. If I had tried it I would have said “it did not deliver for me”.

      I saw a product that promises to do lots of amazing things without any mention of ingredient dosages, so I quite reasonably inferred that these claims will be exaggerated. That’s the way it often is with supplements. Manufacturers list some ingredients, but they don’t tell you if that’s the entire ingredient list, so when you buy it, there’s a few micrograms of Bacopa and a lot of B6 or something. Secrecy is usually a reliable indicator of a second rate product. That’s not too difficult a concept to grasp, so I suppose Cortex isn’t really helping you as much as you think it is.

      Your failure to grasp that I never claimed to have tried Cortex would be stupid enough on its own, but you go on to moan about how you know nothing about me. Either you know who I am and you know I haven’t tried Cortex, or you know neither. Tell me: which is it?

      I’m not really interested in your CV, so I’m not sure why you’re giving it to me. The fact that you’ve founded various companies does not mean that Cortex is a good supplement.

      You basically tried to make CDP Choline look a lot less impressive than it really is, which seems to be in line with the rest of your review here in your very obvious, overt and intentional strategy to discount the efficacy of the stack.

      CDP Choline is great. How much is in Cortex? 0.1ug? 20kg? I’m sure dosage has a big effect on the “impressiveness” of CDP choline.

      So, why hide the dosage? MindLab Pro tells you right on the bottle how much of everything is in there, because there’s plenty. Could it be that you’re hiding a tiny dose of CDP choline? I think so, but please feel free to prove me wrong.


      “You gave it a 1 out of 10 for price because…sell our product for cheap”?

      No, I gave it a 1 out of 10 because in my opinion any product is a rip off if you don’t know what you’re buying. You have listed some ingredients on the website, and for all I know there are 20 other useless ingredients that you haven’t listed which may make up the bulk of the product. That is what probably makes it poor value. If those are the sole ingredients, then say so.

      That you paid thousands of dollars to make your mystery pills has no bearing on whether or not they represent good value. This is all just so simple to understand, I can’t believe anyone taking such a potent nootropic would struggle with this.


      Your theory (which is exactly what it is) that the stack in total (Cortex Gen 1) couldn’t possibly confer short term benefits, based on the notion that the stack was designed to facilitate long term benefits, is also incorrect.

      I’m not sure what your point is here. I never present my opinion as an objective fact; how could it be an objective fact? Do you think theory means that something is just baseless speculation?

      I believe that, as the ingredients in your stack tend to elicit gradual, long-term improvements in mental function, they cannot really be said to confer immediate benefits. Some compounds can do both, but as I understand it, none of the ingredients in Cortex manifest themselves in under a week or two. In the studies I cite regarding UMP, benefits took 4 weeks to become apparent.

      If that counts as short term for you…I really don’t care.

      “No. I apologize if it doesn’t meet your moral, armchair, sideline standards for me to DIVULGE my formula that I worked tirelessly to create”

      There’s no need to apologise. I don’t expect you to meet my standards, but you shouldn’t expect me to change my standards just because their stringency upsets you. That’s for spoiled children, not trail-blazing entrepreneurs like yourself.

      I would also prefer it if you kept your petulant whining about my standards confined to critiquing said standards, and not taking up comment space with self-indulgent claims of grandeur: the “far less of people like me” at the end was just nauseating.

      Where else to refute? Ah.

      I would also be very grateful if you would leave off the self-narration in your little spiels from now on: throwing your toys out of the pram is embarrassing enough, but filling your comment with this sort of rubbish is just cringeworthy.

      In your lengthy response, I didn’t see a breakdown of exact dosages, so I’m going to keep my assumption that you have absolutely nothing to boast about. You might think that unfair, but I’m not really concerned with what you deem fair. Other supplements manage to tell prospective customers what they can expect, so I hold everyone to that standard.

      My primary concern is with pointing people towards what I think are genuinely good nootropics. For me, that means pointing people towards products that actually tell you what’s in them. The reviews on this website make no pretense at being anything other than my personal opinion.

      It’s a shame that you feel oppressed by my opinion that Cortex will be a disappointing supplement, but I am perfectly entitled to that opinion, just as I am entitled to share that opinion. I kindly suggest that you deal with it.

      Reply
  • 2016 at 9:35 pm
    Permalink

    I’m definitely not going to sit and entertain your position on much. It’s obvious, with your affiliate links, that you stand to benefit promoting products like Alpha Brain.

    And – frankly, you’re extremely disrespectful, CRASS, and quite shallow in even writing such a review, the majority of which was nothing but satirical. But..

    You keep maintaining that we should be divulging exact dosages, and I properly addressed that in my first comment. I’m not sure what you don’t understand about that, but I think I can guess. Specifically the fact that you’ve never gone through the long tireless process of building a supplement. Especially a nootropic.

    I deal with people like you all of the time. People that don’t have the capacity to actually do some perspective shifting and thinking about the complexity of a situation they sit and armchair an opinion about. Definitely shows intelligence and wisdom. Ooo! Like that? Just behaving like you a bit. Sarcasm is lovely huh?

    Nauseating that I make the statement that there are far less of me? Why? Because it’s true? The truth is, you’re a nobody, writing insanely inaccurate (and completely rude) reviews about a product you have no idea about, for what again? Because you built a crappy website that no one cares much about, where you try to, through affiliate links, make money from Panama, or wherever you’re at. Some obscure place where you can comfortably talk shit, I’m sure.

    And I am dealing with it (your review). I am dealing with it with a COUNTER opinion, and a very overt CALL OUT on your shallow behavior, satirical post, and complete and total disregard for the notion of trying to find out more before you open your mouth about what’s soon to be an extremely popular nootropic. I mean really, “author,” what kind of person does that? Just curious. You still haven’t divulged your information yet. It’s becoming a lot easier to not take you and your vegan protein site seriously.

    Maybe one day, when you stop armchairing reviews, and start building real things and making a difference in the world, you’ll get exactly what I’m saying. Until then, you’ll just have to knee-jerk respond, because though you try desperately to be a real intellectual, you’re a mere impostor with the ability to post information on a website.

    Your assumption that we have nothing to boast about, I settled. — I am not divulging quantities for competitive reasons. End of story (again? Or will you try to not address that again? Or fail to recognize that as a good answer?). Either way, it’ll all be from the perspective of someone who hasn’t built a business. Enough said.

    And that thousands of dollars were spent creating the Cortex product DOES and SHOULD tell you (it should tell any conscious, wise, deep thinker with the capacity to shift perspectives a bit) that the product has a good bit of thought and care behind it. I’ve always had this beef with people like you. You retards think that we, I, or other people putting out products would spend 15-20K on a meaningless formula?

    This is another testament to your true shallowness, and your unbelievable capacity to be ridiculous. It really is endless huh?

    Stop NOT recognizing and acknowledging your major problem here: you called a page “Cortex Generation 1 Review,” without ever having taken the product. Onlookers likely look at you like one of the characters in the movie idiocracy. I mean, the fact that you did this, is completely insane, but again, shows me that your capacity for creating meaningless, fact-less, baseless content is endless.

    Lastly – if you have a problem with what we “promise,” tough. Are you kidding? Who are you to judge/hate on our documentation, on our website, of exactly what was conveyed to us by beta testers (some of whom are decorated members of the United States Army) when they tried the product?

    Nobody. And a CV, should tell you something about a person. But again – you’re continuing to not acknowledge all of the points that make your ridiculous creation here completely preposterous, all while maintaining questions and assumptions that are either bogus, or have already been sufficiently addressed.

    I wish you the best of luck in life. But somehow, I think you’ll be doomed to writing baseless reviews and sitting in front of your laptop for the rest of your existence.

    Oh yea – what was your name again? Exactly! We’re dealing with an internet anonymous. Well then – this all makes sense now, doesn’t it. I guess we can all go home now.

    Reply
    • 2016 at 9:58 am
      Permalink


      I’m definitely not going to sit and entertain your position on much.

      Then why are you back on here whinging again? It’s clear that you care very much about what I think.

      If you do want to take some kind of high ground though, I’d advise conducting yourself with a little more dignity than this. Here’s a video that might help: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldDHMLBnwDI. It’s a little presumptuous of an iPad repairman to be making videos like this (classic top-button-un-done, guru-because-I-registered-a-business sort of stuff)but I’m sure it will help.

      It’s obvious, with your affiliate links, that you stand to benefit promoting products like Alpha Brain.

      Generally accepted practice is to review products and then to sign up as an affiliate for the ones you think work best. That doesn’t mean I won’t advise people to use a product that I am not an affiliate for. I would receive no rewards for people buying Nootrobox RISE, OptiMind and Excelerol Focus+, but I’m happy to do so. They are pretty up front about their formula, and they’re good stacks.

      You keep maintaining that we should be divulging exact dosages, and I properly addressed that in my first comment.

      No, you explained why you haven’t. What you are yet to explain is why you are unable to reveal your exact formula, but so many other manufacturers can. Look at Mind Lab Pro. Citicoline – 200mg, Bacopa monnieri (45%) – 150mg. I know the makers of Mind Lab will have expended just as much capital and energy on the creation of their formula as you have, if not more than your whopping 20k, but they reveal what’s in their product on their website. There’s a full ingredients list and exact doses. Why can they manage it but you can’t? It’s a very simple question that you are still dodging.

      Lastly – if you have a problem with what we “promise,” tough.

      Yet here you are, whinging to me about it.

      If you have a problem with my skepticism, tough. I don’t really care. Anyone can make a website and make claims about what their supplement can do, and I would warn any consumer to be wary of any such claims, especially when all you have are ingredient lists and no dose details.

      Maybe one day, when you stop armchairing reviews

      You literally made this product in your armchair. Here’s a video of you doing it while writing earnestly in a pad. Very science-y: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpUc303ih4o.

      And that thousands of dollars were spent creating the Cortex product DOES and SHOULD tell you (it should tell any conscious, wise, deep thinker with the capacity to shift perspectives a bit) that the product has a good bit of thought and care behind it.

      The amount of money you spend (or waste) on a product is no indication of its real value, nor is the amount of mental effort it takes you to think of it. The thought and money you put into your product are only indicators of your intelligence and profligacy.

      Your assumption that we have nothing to boast about, I settled. — I am not divulging quantities for competitive reasons.

      As in, because people will see it’s under-dosed?

      Oh yea – what was your name again?

      I never gave you it. Your memory seems to be a bit unreliable. I’d advise supplementing with one of the leading nootropic stacks. Mind Lab might be a good place to start, and if that doesn’t work, Alpha Brain seems to be pretty reliable. You can even look at the ingredients before you buy.

      I do hope you save yourself some embarrassment and stop writing these little tracts. I would have thought you would like to market yourself and your product a little better than this. No one with a shred of self respect would debase themselves like this.

      Reply
      • 2016 at 11:23 pm
        Permalink

        Not going to entertain your BS – it’s quite obvious that you can’t sufficiently address my points. All of my points above say enough about the quality of this website, you as a person, and your reviews. Thanks for the derogatory stuff too – it’s what people do when they’ve been logically battled into a corner.

        Reply
        • 2016 at 1:10 pm
          Permalink

          Thanks for the derogatory stuff too – it’s what people do when they’ve been logically battled into a corner.


          People that don’t have the capacity to actually do some perspective shifting and thinking about the complexity of a situation they sit and armchair an opinion about. Definitely shows intelligence and wisdom. Ooo! Like that? Just behaving like you a bit. Sarcasm is lovely huh?

          Indeed. All of your comments have been full of pathetic attacks like this.


          All of my points above say enough about the quality of this website, you as a person, and your reviews.

          All you’ve done is make yourself look like an insecure idiot.

          Reply
  • 2016 at 9:57 am
    Permalink

    Welcome to the internet Ryan. Truly it is a place where you should engage your brain (nootropically enhanced or not) before you post. Content is here forever.

    I think the reviewer has been unduly harsh on your product, I review products all the time (not nootropics incidentally, but in relation to the proprietary blends it makes no difference) – many companies use them. I don’t believe it’s anything to do with their precious IP or formula, I’ve never seen an absolutely identical formula launched by a rival brand. It is a smokescreen to obscure the dosages and therefore the cost of producing the supplement. It makes it impossible to properly evaluate it and the consumer is left having to trust the company who make it.

    So what are consumers to do here? They are assessing Nootropics and the ingredients, they are reading reviews on different sites. You are saying that they should forget about the dosages and ingredients on other fully disclosed products and trust some ranting lunatic who developed his secret formula on his own in his living room?

    Unfortunately now you’ve made these ill advised comments there is little you can do to retract them. When you do your next product maybe you can learn from this experience.

    Reply
    • 2016 at 11:48 pm
      Permalink

      That’s right – identical formulations are a bit too much, and for legal purposes, folks alter the chemicals slightly.

      Compare Neurofuse to Optimind.
      Alpha Brain to Neurofuse.

      And look at a lot of the mainstream nootropics out there: most of them are the same usual suspects, in sightly different quantities.

      Whereas a few other companies out there are making a bit more specifically targeted, meticulously crafted products. Protecting those formulas, is called having a competitive advantage. – There are many sectors to having an advantage in the market, but one of them is in fact keeping your formula private.

      Cortex is not a nootropic that I decided to make like other nootropics out there. That’s the difference. I could have just put Alpha GPC, Huperzine A, Rhodiola, L-Tyrosine, L-Theanine, and Phosphatidylserine into a run of the mill nootropic, in which case I would have no issue divulging the details of the stack.

      But Cortex is different. It’s not all the usual suspects arbitrarily thrown together, like most other “stacks” are.

      As for your comment on my comments, thanks for your perspective, but most rational human beings understand the need for someone to stand up for inaccurate representations and overtly absurd statements made about something they’ve worked on for years. It’s a shame there aren’t more aggressively debatable people out there like me.

      Ever watch a presidential debate? — Case in point.

      A ranting lunatic? And made the product in his living room? Well – if you did ANY research about me (because that’s easy, because I disclose who I am), you’d know I’m a well known entrepreneur, and US Army combat veteran.

      You’d also have read up on the fact that the actual bottling and preparing of the product is being prepared in an FDA approved, cGMP registered facility in New York. That might be the difference between a consumer, and a very detail oriented person: we do meticulous research before we make unsubstantiated statements.

      And thanks for underestimating my history with the internet, and consumer reviews. As a guy who owns another company (that’s national), that has been running for 4 years, I understand the internet, and consumer’s capacity to write reviews about their experiences with a company.

      And in that time, I’ve seen that there are two types of people: People like the author, “author,” who will haphazardly write harsh reviews, with satirical tone, and highly sarcastic remarks, based on misinformation and shallow opinions, and: considerate individuals, that essentially gut and fact check their positions before posting reviews, appreciate the work that goes into starting, running, and engaging in a business, and give their opinions in a classy, intelligent, fact based way that reflects etiquette, wisdom, and a perspective that isn’t driven partially by a conflict of interest.

      BTW, here’s a TedX talk by my platoon leader about an attack that happened on my platoon in Iraq: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORBf73HiJns – Again, so you can retract (in your head – because it won’t happen here) your statements about some me being some unknown lunatic.

      Perhaps – when and if you ever launch a product, you will learn from that experience, and we’ll be on more of a similar page than you imagine we could be, now.

      Take care, “Rob W.”

      Reply
      • 2016 at 1:13 pm
        Permalink

        Whereas a few other companies out there are making a bit more specifically targeted, meticulously crafted products.

        Your ingredients are basic, and your formula is bound to be similar to other products. We all know what safe dosages are, so it’s just a matter of making something that’s within those limits and maximally effective while minimising side effects. It isn’t hard, although you seem to think you’ve discovered something revolutionary.

        A ranting lunatic? And made the product in his living room? Well – if you did ANY research about me (because that’s easy, because I disclose who I am), you’d know I’m a well known entrepreneur, and US Army combat veteran.

        Neither of those facts mean that you aren’t a raving lunatic, and neither show that you didn’t make the product in your living room. If only people were as debatable as you Ryan.


        BTW, here’s a TedX talk by my platoon leader about an attack that happened on my platoon in Iraq: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORBf73HiJns – Again, so you can retract (in your head – because it won’t happen here) your statements about some me being some unknown lunatic.

        Not sure what your military service has got to do with anything.

        It’s a shame there aren’t more aggressively debatable people out there like me.

        Presidential debates are usually full of tawdry rubbish of this nature. But yes, you are debatable as a person.

        Once again Ballow, you’ve disgraced yourself on the internet. Quite the elite achiever.

        Reply
  • 2016 at 4:16 pm
    Permalink

    I’m not in the slightest bit interested in anyone on this thread’s military experience and I have neither the time or inclination to do any research on you Ryan.

    To clarify my point about the living room, you yourself said it in your first post here Ryan;

    “We have a formula that I bled, sweated, and cried making for over a year, with a lab I set up in my living room”

    Reply
    • 2016 at 3:57 pm
      Permalink

      I guess I have to spell it out for you, because your futile attempts to actually have a winning logical argument are getting depressing.

      One has to formulate a product first. You can’t just send a list of ingredients and quantities to a product manufacturer without testing it rigorously first. I discovered the formula for Cortex while experimenting at home for a year intensely, and 4-5 years in total fussing with nootropics in general.

      Once I had the formula right, and many beta testers had confirmed major benefits, the manufacturing process started in a cGMP facility, in the United States.

      Once again, for all the 3 people a month that might read this review, you’re proving me right, making your review less and less credible, and giving oxygen to the fact that you both wrote an extremely insufficient review on a product you never tried, AND followed up in the comments section with different names from the same person to try to hang on in a desperate attempt to change the ton of the game (the tone being: I’m winning, and you’re now doing doggie paddles in the deep end).

      Get a life! And nice stock unpaid wordpress theme. It proves MY point, that you’re some punk without a life, that can’t even craft himself a respectable website design, doing reviews about products he never tried. I mean that alone is preposterous! You never tried it.

      No worries though – when the reviews start coming out from people that have tried it, this’ll all be just a dream. Thanks for the oxygen though! “Rob W.”

      PS – my military career has everything to do with it. You make the contention that we’re some fly by the night company that non judiciously makes product concoctions that we don’t share because we have something to hide, and that I’m a raving lunatic.

      But in reality I’m a decorated United States Army soldier with a tour in Iraq, that’s platoon made the news on many occasions, that turned entrepreneur and started building successful companies.

      You’ll try to somehow negate the significance of that, but your readers won’t. So – it’ll be largely futile, like everything else you’ve done here.

      Reply
      • 2016 at 11:48 pm
        Permalink

        Your military service doesn’t mean that Cortex is a good product. How long you spent developing it does not make Cortex a good product.

        You might need to send exact dosages to the manufacturers, but that doesn’t mean those serving sizes are any good to the consumer. 1 microgram or 1000, the capping facility will hardly care.

        If three people read this a month, how does that make it less credible? It makes it less popular than blogs that get more views than that, and it makes it less damaging to you than a similar review on a more popular site, certainly. But less credible? You do know what credible means? Or is this “debatable” all over again?

        You’ve been quite clear on reddit that you find the dosages in some supplements to be less than ideal. According to you, any more than 200mg of Alpha GPC and you get fatigued. So you must agree that a consumer has an interest in knowing the exact dosages, surely? Well, you would if you could understand your own statements.

        Since you clearly need my approval, I wish you all the best. Hope the living room lab can keep up with all those orders flooding in. Hopefully you can now stop leaving me incredibly pretentious and verbose comments.

        Reply
  • 2016 at 12:58 am
    Permalink

    okay so i came across this and i just had to comment… who are you and why do you have the authroity to make such asinine assumptions about natural nootropics such as bacopa.. “Some manufacturers are suggesting that it has the ability to improve synaptic communication, but I have my doubts.” who on this planet died and gave you the intelligence to suggest this? buy the most basic nootropic book thats available in a book store and you will see bacopa has been used as a nootropic for ages,. this is right out of my book ” the everything guide to nootropics”. “bacopa contains active chemicals known as bacosides. meta-analysis of these bacosides found great potential at improving the speed of attention and memory recall on subjects.” so right then and there this proves you are nothing but an armchair warrior with mustard stains on your shirt with empty two litres of mountain dew all over your mothers basement. Also why would you give a 1/10 score to a nootropic that you havent tried and you have no idea about the compounds that make up this stack. clearly your being paid by another noot company to make shitty uneducated review about competitors. which is another reason that leads me to believe you rode the short bus to school which certainly doesnt give you the right to rate nootropics since they obviously havent made any improvements to your brain malfunctions.

    “For instance, visitors to the website are told that “Cortex Gen 1 nootropic also delivers a powerful short term and working memory effect that appears consistent in all of the early adopters/test subjects we’ve used to sample the product”.

    If that’s true, then these guys have produced supplement gold. ”
    Another quote from your review…. this really makes me upset for your parents and the fact they reproduced something so stupid that they dont even understand the basic functions of nootropics, considering that the main function of ALL NOOTROPICS has to do with boosting short term and working memory. This is getting too easy to make you look stupid jesus man i feel sorry for your parents.

    “Supplementing with choline is not an efficient way to increase the availability of acetylcholine, as it is not properly able to cross the blood-brain barrier.”
    another quote from your review… ok now i really feel sorry for your parents… and the people you work for because you just soo dumb… CDP choline is one of the most bioavailable forms of choline that is out there where do you get your research from? i would like to pay those websites a visit and make them feel the way your feeling in your mothers basement. honestly man im not even going to go any further into your review because i give you a -10/10 your just that terrible at your job. this almost makes me want to pull a jay and silent bob on you and show up at your doorstep with a copy of your review and punch you in the throat once youve admitted to this uneducated rant funded by a competitor. sleep well sewer rat.

    Reply
    • 2016 at 6:55 am
      Permalink

      okay so I came across this and I just had to comment

      Why say this so explicitly? Seems rather contrived.

      who are you and why do you have the authroity to make such asinine assumptions about natural nootropics such as bacopa

      Nobody has the authority, or indeed the authroity, to hold asinine opinions about herbal supplements. Nor any opinions for that matter.

      CDP choline is one of the most bioavailable forms of choline that is out there where do you get your research from

      Indeed it is. Many people wonder why you should take CDP-choline instead of just straight choline, since that is what you’re interested in boosting. But, as I said, supplementing with choline is not an efficient way of increasing choline availability. The best way is to take an analogue, like CDP-choline.

      “Some manufacturers are suggesting that it has the ability to improve synaptic communication, but I have my doubts.” who on this planet died and gave you the intelligence to suggest this? buy the most basic nootropic book thats available in a book store and you will see bacopa has been used as a nootropic for ages,

      That it has been a nootropic for ages doesn’t mean it can improve synaptic communication. That it has long been known as a memory booster does not mean that it directly improves synaptic communication. I think it probably has another mechanism of action. This is really easy to understand.

      so right then and there this proves you are nothing but an armchair warrior with mustard stains on your shirt with empty two litres of mountain dew all over your mothers basement.

      No, what you quoted proves that some studies have found bacopa improves memory function – something never questioned on this site.

      Also why would you give a 1/10 score to a nootropic that you havent tried and you have no idea about the compounds that make up this stack.

      Because my rating system doesn’t depend on me having tried the product.


      considering that the main function of ALL NOOTROPICS has to do with boosting short term and working memory

      Indeed, but a powerful shot term memory increase would certainly make a supplement stand out from the crowd. Very few nootropics actually deliver this. It would make your supplement (as you’re clearly associated with Cortex in some way – the poo punctuation and over-use of adjectives give it away) “gold” if it actually did this for most users.

      honestly man im not even going to go any further into your review because i give you a -10/10 your just that terrible at your job.

      I thank you for your wonderful review of my Cortex Generation 1 review. If you have any more insightful comments to make, please do leave them and I’ll reply when I have time.

      clearly your being paid by another noot company to make shitty uneducated review about competitors.

      I’m not. Just giving my opinion on some mystery pills. Your means it belongs to you, you’re means you are. You were looking for the latter.


      sleep well sewer rat.

      Like a baby.

      Reply
    • 2016 at 1:48 am
      Permalink

      Wow, what are the odds that two separate unhinged comments attacking the author coincidentally use the cliched image of “armchair”?

      No chance whatsoever both are from the same hyper-aggressive uneducated low-IQ troglodyte sock puppeteer with 7th-grade writing skills playing “entrepreneur” peddling his me-too nootropic stack that’s obviously destined for failure.

      Laughing out loud, bro.

      Reply
      • 2016 at 11:10 am
        Permalink

        The “I just came across this and had to comment” really jumps out at you doesn’t it?

        We actually happened to receive two comments from the same IP address that seemed to have been made completely independent of each other; one from Ryan and one from “Jevier”.

        What are the odds?!

        Reply
  • 2016 at 12:56 am
    Permalink

    Are you kiddings? You write review on product you don’t try?

    Lacking credibility BIGTIME man.

    No one is going to trust this review.

    Reply
    • 2016 at 9:20 am
      Permalink

      Lacking credibility BIGTIME man.

      If that’s your opinion then I advise you to look for a source you deem more credible before making a purchasing decision. If you can find somewhere that can tell you Cortex dose info, that would be ideal, but unfortunately, I don’t think there are any.

      No one is going to trust this review.

      Thanks for the feedback.

      The IP address used to post this comment is the same as the one used by Ryan Ballow to post previous comments. Strange that.

      Reply
      • 2016 at 9:24 pm
        Permalink

        BUSTED!

        Sockpuppeting is dishonest and pathetic, so I suppose those terms apply equally to sock puppeteer “Ryan Michael Ballow.” What a chump.

        Does he even realize this is on page one of Google results for his “product?”

        Reply
        • 2016 at 11:15 am
          Permalink

          He knows full well that this post is on page one of the search results for his product, but he took great joy in telling us that very few people actually read this post (we can only assume he is using one of the very inaccurate searchbar tools). We’ve never seen a manufacturer so happy to tell people that nobody is searching for their product!

          Reply
  • 2016 at 3:30 am
    Permalink

    Dear Ryan,

    Step 1: sell more Cortex
    Step 2: hire someone for PR
    Step 3: stop making an ass of yourself in places people are researching your product

    Good luck!

    Reply
  • 2017 at 12:18 am
    Permalink

    Man this made my day, freaking hilarious back and forth between “author” and ryan. Its comedy gold.
    I have to say though, keeping a formula secret makes sense to me,and the fact that because of that, you review his product at 2.3 is kind of ridiculous. Your review wasent very good, you should work on your writing, BUT i do agree with something, that ryan guy just destroyed his chances to sell his product, he just sucks.

    Reply
    • 2017 at 8:29 am
      Permalink

      Hi Alex,

      Yes it is quite a harrowing read isn’t it? The fact that this man wants people to buy his mystery pills is beyond me.

      The fact that he might have a good reason for concealing his formula doesn’t concern us. He is in a competitive marketplace, and since other companies can tell us what we’re taking, he loses. We’re not here to pat manufacturers on the back for a good try; we’re here to help people get the best value for their money. You may find it ridiculous, but that’s our rubric. It doesn’t need to conform to what others find reasonable.

      He has since started an online magazine. Perhaps this will be more successful than attacking people for not wanting to buy his mystery brain pills.

      Thanks for the unsolicited feedback regarding the writing. I assure you your opinion means a great deal to us. It’s wasn’t, not wasent.

      Reply
  • 2017 at 9:10 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks for the review of Cortex Generation 1. It is very helpful.

    Reply
    • 2017 at 1:19 am
      Permalink

      No problem.

      We will be updating it shortly to make it more concise.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *